Your “Welcome to Fascism” reading list

It’s becoming increasingly unwieldy for me to keep track of good analyses of and calls to action with regards to the epic clusterfuck that is the rise of global fascism we seem to be experiencing. So here’s my masterlist of stuff I have found useful, thought-provoking, and terrifying over the last week and a half. I’ll probably keep updating it for a little while. A large chunk of the below come with content notes for discussions of racism, misogyny, queerphobia, violence.

The comprehensive exit poll data. (The Education by Race line speaks volumes.)

A very early Twitter thread by @yeloson on how profoundly some of our lives may change as a result of this. [discussion of cancer and death]

Let we forget, within hours of polls closing, this is what it felt like to be a Muslim woman in America.

Thread on the radicalisation of white men in online spaces by @SiyandaWrites. (The threading on this is somewhat messy and some of the responses are violent.)

Thread on what the left needs to do to create a powerful vision and message by Sunny Singh.

The Mary Sue’s Internet Privacy 101.

And the EFF’s Surveillance Self Defense.

A reminder from @ab_silvera that there are more victims of US policy outside the US. (Follow-up tweets.)

Charlie Stross’s initial analysis of Trump’s election. This man is scarily accurate in his analyses, to the point where’s written himself out of job.

The tactics we’re seeing global fascism use emerged during the break-up of Yugoslavia by @JasminMuj.

@flexlibris on operational security and securing your comms.

The feminist classroom as a safe space post Brexit and Trump by @alisonphipps.

Sunny Singh again on how neoliberalism has improved the lives of many around the world, at the same time as being exploitative. There are no easy answers here.

One for Americans, on how your political systems works and what the best ways are of influencing it.

@HarryGiles on how bad things are.

@pookleblinky‘s thread on how fascism is an exponential process.

Me on the importance of not normalising fascism.

@yeloson again on cyberpunk, racism, humanity and Trump.

Safety pins? Here are some things you can do to actually make people safer, by @siliconphospho.

@alwaystheself on how white supremacy socialises us to dismiss and minimise the terror it inflicts.

@UnburntWitch on the safety pin thing and dealing with constructive criticism in activism.

@scattermoon on the Jo Cox murder and how media has been minimising and dismissing the threat of fascism since before Brexit and Trump.

Masha Gessen’s rules for survival in an autocracy.

The 14 characteristics of fascism.

@aurabogado on Obama’s role in maintaining the good immigrant/bad immigrant dichotomy.

@ChiefElk on tech and social media’s role in enabling fascism.

@DNLee5 on racist selective memories of the Civil Rights Movement.

Flavia Dzodan on white feminism’s inadequacies and our desperate need for intersectional feminism.

@mxbees on privacy tools and digital rights for those who most need them.

We have got to stop devaluing black women’s knowledge.

Me on how liberals without a lived experience of a hostile state do not have the tools to fight fascism.

Roja Bandari on the the normality of living in a religious dictatorship.

Kali Holloway: Stop asking me to empathise with the white working class.

Me on the discursive coupling of “America” and “freedom”.

And among all this, Britain passes the most extreme surveillance law ever in a democracy.

Pookleblinky again, on how fascism quickly accumulates power by putting people through a series of obedience tests.

@mcclure111 on the bullshit that is “post-identity liberalism”.

@jpbrammer on how white working class Americans see themselves.

@AndrayDomise on what we should be calling the people who call themselves the “alt-right” – his recommendation is neo-Nazis.

Sarah Kendzior on how to be a light in dark times. Contains the most chilling paragraph I have read in the last ten days: “Write a list of things you would never do. Because it is possible that in the next year, you will do them.”

Cat Velente on American greatness.

Charlie Stross on the scope of the fight we’re facing.

Laurie Penny on bargaining, normalisation and mental health.

Me again, with an action plan of sorts for starting to fight this thing.

Mikki Kendall on why white working class voters need to be held accountable for voting against their own interests.

A thread live-tweeting FeministaJones’s talk at UPenn.

What the First Amendment Defense Act will mean for queer people in the US.

And a thread on FADA’s impact specifically on trans women. CN transmisogynist violence.

@Asher_Wolf on treating Trump & co. like cranky toddlers.

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  1. Pingback: Holiday Reading Lists – .small stones.

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